Jacques Bus

Secretary General Digital Enlightenment Forum

Jacques Bus received his PhD in Science and Mathematics at the University of Amsterdam. He worked as a researcher for 12 years and subsequently as research program manager for 5 years at CWI/NWO in Amsterdam (NL).

From 1988 he worked at the European Commission in leading positions in various parts of the Research programmes ESPRIT and ICT, including IT infrastructure, program management, software engineering and since 2004 in trust and security. He has been strongly involved in the establishment of the Security Theme in FP7, the EC Research funding programme.

Since 2010 he works as an independent advisor on Trust, Security, Privacy and Identity in the digital environment. He has been 3 years business director of the Dutch Privacy and Identity Lab (www.pilab.nl) He is Secretary General of Digital Enlightenment Forum.

Recent Activity

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Sunday, May 26

  • 12:57pm

    reception and light lunch available from 12.30

     

    After many years of research, demonstration and limited implementations, digital identification and authentication is still not user-friendly, privacy respecting and broadly usable, except in some small states, or industry sectors. Even in banking, where good authentication is crucial many different systems are around and is not symmetrical: the client authenticates to the bank and not vice versa.

    Last year the European eIDAS regulation came to effect, which allows cooperation between identification systems of governments for their own services. But this does not change easily authentication for banking, shopping, proving one’s age or education. This all still needs different methods and credentials.

    In this workshop we bring together people to discuss the steps needed on top of eIDAS, to make identification and authentication on the Internet easy and trustworthy.

    We will start with a presentation on eIDAS and its foreseen future developments. This will be followed by presentations of private systems existing or under development that are privacy respecting and easy to use and which can build on existing government or otherwise backed ID data. It will include attribute-based systems, Self-Sovereign ID and Block Chain based ID.

    It will be complemented by a presentation on the problems of governments to make progress to develop citizen-friendly eID systems.

    Speakers are:

    Andrea Servida (HoU EC CNECT/eGovernment and Trust): eIDAS, its status and future developments.

    Bart Jacobs (prof Radboud Univ Nijmegen, NL): IRMA, a privacy respecting and user friendly eID system

    Elly Plooij – van Gorsel (Chair of the Dutch Government Committee on eID) eID developments in The Netherlands

    Ghassan Karame (NecLab, DE): Block Chain for ID management

    Stephan Krenn (AIT, AT): Privacy preserving Self-Sovereign ID management.

    In cooperaton with:

     

Friday, April 12

Sunday, March 17

Thursday, January 31

Tuesday, January 8

  • 9:58pm

    In a blog: Block Chain's Occam Problem  Mckinsey expresses doubts on the usefulness of applications of Block Chain, in particular in financal industry, but also on the potential in many other application areas.The blog is a worthy reading.
    Particularly also the conclusions that there can nevertheless be real potential in specific cases which would shift ownership on data from corporations to consumers. An excellent example seems to be private Block Chains that give members control (by having the crypto key on the ledger) over who can read the ledger, which could be an extending set of Identity or personal data, personal medical data etc.

    Suggestions have been made already on ID management by Kim Cameron (see his "Laws of Identity on the Block Chain" of 27 May 2018 on his BLOG).

    Similar ideas can be worked out for e-Portfolios, i.e. ledgers of personal education and experience badges.

    The conclusion might indeed be as stated HERE that Block Chain becomes mature and ... boring.

Monday, December 31 2018

Friday, December 14 2018

  • 11:34am

    On 8 Nov 2018 DigEnlight organised a workshop on the above subject.

    You can find the scope description and the programme at HERE.

    In the Library of this space (see tab above) you can find a summary and full report.

    A number of questions and ideas came up during the discussions in Panel 3, which I copy below

    QUESTIONS

    1. Why the education is not centralized in Europe? Why Aaron thinks it should not be centralized? Do you have the same opinion?
    2. Who is deciding the curriculae for employees of the European Commission? How the permanent learning is done?
    3. We have developed a mid-career transition online training platform that we would like to make available, which channel is the best to reach learners at scale?
    4. As a student I was very good at numerical reasoning tests. This week I had to do one for recruitment and struggled. Can you forget this skill, become rusty?
    5. How we can access and obtain the lessons presented by Xavier?
    6. Knowledge nuggets - excellent way of learning. Where we can obtain a list of existing nuggets?
    7. Which are the curriculae and learning courses for the people already working in the Commission? Can you give examples of training courses? And certifications.

     IDEAS

    1. Education should focus on nurturing creativity so that people are able to ‘learn to learn’ later in life.
    2. Create learning ecosystems, bringing together academia, business and policy makers.
    3. Collaboration, cooperation, critical and creative thinking are the essential pillars of new pedagogy.
    4. Why Education is not centralized all over Europe?
    5. Promoting STEM skills st secondary education level and creating inclusive educational environments.
    6. Stronger promotion of Bologna. EU students are still not mobile enough. Partially because they are unaware of the mechanism that enables them to do their (STEM) Masters elsewhere.
    7. EU level (respected, fraud-proof) digital/entrepreneurial skills certification for online and blended learning.

    I invite everyone to join the discussion by registering at this site as a (free) user and comment below.

Wednesday, November 28 2018

Tuesday, November 20 2018

  • 7:56pm

    Privacy Camp will take place just before the start of the CPDP conference. Privacy Camp brings together civil society, policy-makers and academia to discuss existing and looming problems for human rights in the digital environment.

    Call for Proposals: Platforms, Politics, Participation

    Privacy Camp 2019 will focus on digital platforms, their societal impact and political significance. Due to the rise of a few powerful companies such as Uber, Facebook, Amazon or Google, the term “platform” has moved beyond its initial computational meaning of technological architecture and has come to be understood as a socio-cultural phenomenon. Platforms are said to facilitate and shape human interactions, thus becoming important economic and political actors. While the companies offering platform services are increasingly the target of regulative action, they are also considered as allies of national and supranational institutions in enforcing policies voluntarily and gauging political interest and support. Digital platforms employ business models that rely on the collection of large amounts of data and the use of advanced algorithms, which raise concerns about their surveillance potential and their impact on political events. Increasingly rooted in the daily life of many individuals, platforms monetise social interactions and turn to questionable labor practices. Many sectors and social practices are being “platformised”, from public health to security, from news to entertainment services. Lately, some scholars have conceptualised this phenomenon as “platform capitalism” or “platform society”.

     Privacy Camp 2019 will unpack the implications of “platformisation” for the socio-political fabric, human rights and policy making. In particular, how does the platform logic shape our experiences and the world we live in? How do institutional actors attempt to regulate platforms? In what ways do the affordances and constraints of platforms shape how people share and make use of their data?

    Participate!

    We welcome panel proposals relating to the broad theme of platforms. Besides classic panel proposals we are also seeking short contributions for our workshop “Situating Platforms: User Narratives”.

    1. Panel proposals

    We are particularly interested in panel proposals on the following topics: platform economy and labour; algorithmic bias; democratic participation and social networks.

    Submission guidelines:

    • Indicate a clear objective for your session, i.e. what would be a good outcome for you?
    • Indicate other speakers that could participate in your panel (...
    Read more
  • 11:41am

    During the 3rd Panel of the Workshop on 8 Nov we collected Questions and Ideas electronically. Unfortunately there was little time to come to a discussion on these. I provide them here for your comments and discussion on these pages:

    Panel 3

    QUESTIONS

    1. Why the education is not centralized in Europe? Why Aaron thinks it should not be centralized? Do you have the same opinion?
    2. Who is deciding the curriculae for employees of the European Commission? How the permanent learning is done?
    3. We have developed a mid-career transition online training platform that we would like to make available, which channel is the best to reach learners at scale?
    4. As a student I was very good at numerical reasoning tests. This week I had to do one for recruitment and struggled. Can you forget this skill, become rusty?
    5. How we can access and obtain the lessons presented by Xavier?
    6. Knowledge nuggets - excellent way of learning. Where we can obtain a list of existing nuggets?
    7. Which are the curriculae and learning courses for the people already working in the Commission? Can you give examples of training courses? And certifications.

     IDEAS

    1. Education should focus on nurturing creativity so that people are able to ‘learn to learn’ later in life.
    2. Create learning ecosystems, bringing together academia, business and policy makers.
    3. CDEASollaboration, cooperation, critical and creative thinking are the essential pillars of new pedagogy.
    4. Why Education is not centralized all over Europe?
    5. Promoting STEM skills st secondary education level and creating inclusive educational environments.
    6. Stronger promotion of Bologna. EU students are still not mobile enough. Partially because they are unaware of the mechanism that enables them to do their (STEM) Masters elsewhere.
    7. EU level (respected, fraud-proof) digital/entrepreneurial skills certification for online and blended learning.